We at Responza take security pretty seriously. We lock down networks, servers, and workstations so that each and every layer of your IT infrastructure is up to our best practice standards. One of the other ways we help our customers keep their data secure is by educating end users on some of the different ways that they can safeguard their data themselves. In this post we’ll go over using passwords to protect your documents on PC and Mac.

PART I: PC

Go to the File tab on your ribbon and select Info. Click on the Protect Document pulldown and select Encrypt with Password:

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This will cause a dialog box to pop up in which you can enter a password of your choosing:

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When someone tries to open that document, they have to enter the password:

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As expected, if they get it correct then the document opens:

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PART II: MAC

Like a good worker bee, I often take some of my work home to finish up. I have a Mac at home though, so let’s see what this process looks like on that machine…

In the Review tab, click on the button labeled Protect.

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Now you’ve got a couple of options. You can set a password so that anyone who wants to access the document will have to enter a password. If you use the “password to modify” field, only authorized users can make changes to your document. Anyone not authorized to make changes is still able to open the document, and they can even save it for themselves under a different file name. Click OK and you’ve locked down your document with a password. I find this especially useful for version control or when working with templates that are used frequently.

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When accessing the document, you’ll now receive a prompt similar to the one that pops up in Windows.

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I cannot stress this enough – record your password. If you forget the access or modification password for a document, there’s not an easy way to get it open. It’s not as simple as calling up your sys admin and requesting a password-reset, so write it down!